Universal Classic Monster Films to Stream Free for a Week on YouTube

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Universal Classic Monster Films to Stream Free for a Week on YouTube

Universal Classic Monster Films to Stream Free for a Week on YouTube

According to NME, NBCUniversal has announced that seven of their classic monster films including 1931’s Dracula and 1931’s The Mummy will be streaming for free on the company’s YouTube channel Fear: The Home of Horror. Each movie will be available for viewing for a week, starting on Friday, January 15, 2021. In addition, during each film’s premiere week, the selected films will also be made available for digital purchase at a discounted price. Check out the YouTube premiere schedule of the seven iconic monster films below!

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Available on January 15, 2021 (8pm GMT)

Dracula (1931)

The Mummy (1932)

Available on January 16, 2021 (8pm GMT)

Frankenstein (1931)

Bride Of Frankenstein (1935)

Available on January 17, 2021 (8pm GMT)

The Invisible Man (1933)

The Wolf Man (1941)

Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948)

Following the success of last year’s The Invisible Man, Universal Pictures is continuing to develop and produce a bunch of new projects centered around their wide collection of classic monster films. The growing list of upcoming monster projects includes Paul Feig’s Dark ArmyDexter Fletcher’s film about Dracula henchman RenfieldElizabeth Banks’ Invisible Woman, Matt Stawki’s Monster Mash, Karyn Kusama’s Dracula, the Ryan Gosling-led Wolfman film, David Keopp’s long-in-development The Bride of Frankenstein reboot, Josh Cooley’s Little Monsters film, Blumhouse’s The Thing adaptation, the James Wan-produced Van Helsing movie, and an untitled monster thriller from Phil Lord and Chris Miller.

RELATED: Bride of Frankenstein: David Koepp Confirms Project is Still in Active Development

Universal Pictures attempted to create its own shared universe with its legacy monsters; an ambitious project that would have featured the likes of Johnny Depp, Angelina Jolie, and Javier Bardem. Then The Mummy, starring Tom Cruise, crashed and burned with a middling $409 million worldwide gross and subsequently derailed Universal’s Dark Universe.

Because of that, the studio has decided to abandon the shared universe approach and instead focus on character-driven films guided by strong filmmakers and good stories. The first result of their new strategy was Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man starring Elisabeth Moss and Oliver Jackson-Cohen which garnered positive reviews from critics and had grossed over $57 million in its opening weekend on a $7 million budget.