Weekend Box-Office: ‘The Devil Inside’ Scares Up $34.5 Million and an F CinemaScore

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We have a weekend in which a box-office record falls and it’s only the second weekend of 2012 and it comes courtesy of a film that earned an F CinemaScore, which is to say, “Yup, sounds about right.”

Let’s have a look and see what’s what…

Laremy predicted the #1 movie correctly 0 Weeks In A Row

The Devil Inside

The Devil Inside
The Devil Inside now holds the record for the largest box-office opening for an R-rated film in January, topping 2010’s The Book of Eli. The film, however, earned an F CinemaScore from the moviegoing audience although the math is in doubt as a Paramount exec emailed Deadline saying, “[T]he breakdown was ‘A’ = 16%, ‘B’ = 18%, ‘C’ = 24%, ‘D’ = 23%, ‘F’ = 19%. I’ll admit I went to public school but I think this should have got us a ‘C’!”

Either way, whether it’s an F or a C, it’s not good. Audiences are typically kind after they’ve spent their money and once you hit that C threshold you’re already in the dog house.

Poor CinemaScore or not, Paramount has every reason to be happy as they picked up this film for only $1 million and have already more than made their money back, primarily thanks to an excellent marketing campaign. I don’t expect the film to do much in the coming weeks, but it’s already done what it needed to do.

When it comes to reader predictions, I have to admit, Chris Etrata is impressive with a $35 million prediction. Chris, how do you do it?

Weekend: $34.5 million
RottenTomatoes Score: 7%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #2 and his prediction of $15 million was $19.5m off for a percentage error of 56.52%.
Only a 35% drop and Mission: Impossible has surpassed the $170 million mark and it only needs another $45 million to pass Mission: Impossible II and become the highest grossing film in the franchise. I have to assume with this film’s response Paramount is going to move a little bit faster on the turnaround time for a sequel than normal as it has typically been 4-5 years between films.
Weekend: $20.5 million (-35.1% drop) / Cume: $170.2 million / RottenTomatoes: 93%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #1 with $17.67 million, which is $2.83m off for a 13.8% error.
Made on a reported budget of $125 million and now having crossed $157 million domestically and over $270 million worldwide, I wonder if WB will get to work on a third film. This one is clearly under-performing when compared to the first feature, which would make me wary as an exec for a third film, unless the budget could be cut back a smidge.
Weekend: $14 million (-36.4% drop) / Cume: $157.4 million / RottenTomatoes: 59%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #4 with $11.27 million, which is $2.73m off for a 19.5% error.
A 30% drop and it still has more business to do overseas. Once DVD and Blu-ray sales are taken into account it will probably break even and I have to assume people that have already seen it will be curious to see where it goes from here, most likely making a sequel worth Columbia’s while.
Weekend: $11.4 million (-30.1% drop) / Cume: $76.8 million / RottenTomatoes: 86%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #3 with $11.85 million, which is $0.45m off for a 3.95% error.
Trying to understand film budgets is damn near impossible. Some films with a lot of CG cost around $45 million and some even lower. This film with CG chipmunks cost a reported $75 million. I don’t get it, is it the music rights that throw this one over?
Weekend: $9.5 million (-47.8% drop) / Cume: $111.5 million
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #6 with $8.59 million, which is $0.91m off for a 9.58% error.
Tomorrow the Directors Guild will be announcing their Director of the Year nominees and some are speculating Steven Spielberg may be the lone man out with Tate Taylor (The Help) taking his place. I wonder, is it possible for War Horse to miss out on a Best Picture nomination as well? Eh, I guess anything is possible…
Weekend: $8.6 million (-49.1% drop) / Cume: $56.8 million / RottenTomatoes: 76%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #5 with $10.6 million, which is $2m off for a 23.26% error.
Word has it this film has inspired several people to being purchasing random businesses from aquariums to run-down water parks.
Weekend: $8.4 million (-41.3% drop) / Cume: $56.5 million / RottenTomatoes: 62%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #8 with $7.67 million, which is $0.73m off for a 8.69% error.
I have nothing to say about Tintin other than it’s doing just fine. Good on yah Tintin.
Weekend: $6.6 million (-45.9% drop) / Cume: $61.8 million / RottenTomatoes: 75%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #7 with $8.12 million, which is $1.52m off for a 23.03% error.
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy went from 57 theaters to 809 this weekend and came in with a $7,129 per theater average. Laremy’s prediction was a little high since he didn’t have accurate theater counts before he posted and went with 1,000 so he came pretty close and I also noticed down the street from me is a little art house theater and there was a line to see this film and the target demographic was well represented.
Weekend: $5.7 million / Cume: $10.4 million / RottenTomatoes: 85%
Laremy’s rank: Laremy picked it to finish #9 with $7.2 million, which is $1.5m off for a 26.32% error.
People are still catching up on the new year celebration and catching this one a little late. You’re forgiven, but watching this movie is only going to prolong that hangover.
Weekend: $3.2 million (-52.2% drop) / Cume: $52 million / RottenTomatoes: 7%
Laremy’s rank: Not Ranked

In other news, Meryl Streep starrer The Iron Lady won the per theater crown this weekend taking in $172,000 from five theaters for a $34,400 per theater average. Oscar Foreign Language contender A Separation brought in $97,000 from six theaters for a $16,167 per theater average and also in six theaters was Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, which managed $96,000 and a $16,000 per theater average.

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