The 5 Essential Ahsoka Episodes of The Clone Wars

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The 5 Essential Ahsoka Episodes of The Clone Wars

Ahsoka Tano made her long-anticipated live-action debut in Season 2 of The Mandalorian and fans are justifiably ecstatic about the possibilities the show presents for the character. Even so, we thought it’d be fun to look back at her most prolific Clone Wars episodes — a difficult task as Ahsoka has a number of terrific episodes designed around her person.

So, without further ado, here are our favorite Ahsoka episodes. Feel free to share yours in the comments below!

“A Friend in Need” (Season 4, Episode 14)

There are any number of episodes where Ahsoka learns valuable life lessons that help her become a better Jedi, and while “A Friend in Need” demonstrates her unwavering devotion to the cause, it also gives the young Jedi one of her best fight sequences as she takes on Death Watch leader, Pre Vizsla, who wields the legendary dark saber.

The duel is brief, but it does demonstrate just how far Ahsoka has come throughout the series and also ties in nicely with the latest episode of The Mandalorian when Din Djarin quips, “A Jedi and a Mandalorian? They’ll never see it coming.”

“The Mortis Trilogy” (Season 3, Episodes 14-16)

“The Mortis Trilogy” stands out mainly due to its depictions of the Force and the ways in which it portrays Anakin as a man who fears losing those closest to him as evident in the numerous visions he has throughout the events of the story. Yet, the three-part episode also gives Ahsoka a chance to shine as she comes face to face with her older self who tells her to leave Anakin or risk falling to the dark side. It’s the first warning Ahsoka receives about her master and it has drastic repercussions throughout the show and even carries over into Star Wars: Rebels.

Plus, Ahsoka shows off some of her nifty moves when she turns evil and proceeds to attack Anakin and Obi-Wan. Oh, and Ahsoka basically dies and is revived by one of three powerful beings known as the Daughter. It’s all a bit weird, but also pretty great too.

“Lightsaber Lost” (Season 2, Episode 11)

After losing her lightsaber outside of a bar during a fight, Ahsoka finds herself working alongside a Jedi Master named Tera Sinube to find an assassin called Nack Movers. The action picks up with the arrival of criminal Cassie Cryar that culminates with a high-speed chase atop a train. Lightsaber Lost lacks the more polished look of the later Clone Wars seasons, but functions as a solid episode for Ahsoka who learns that patience is an important characteristic for any Jedi — especially one who has just lost their lightsaber.

“The Wrong Jedi” (Season 5, Episode 20)

“The Wrong Jedi” is the culmination of a series of episodes in which Ahsoka finds herself fleeing from her allies, aka the Jedi Order, after they falsely accuse her of bombing the Jedi Temple. Despite intervention from Anakin, who helps prove her innocence, Ahsoka loses all faith in the Jedi and walks away from the Order in perhaps the single most powerful moment for the character.

“Victory and Death” (Season 7, Episode 12)

In truth, the final four episodes of The Clone Wars Season 7 are the best Ahsoka episodes, hands down. Beginning with “Old Friends Not Forgotten,” the last two hours of the popular show feel like a movie thanks to stellar animation, terrific voice work, and a story that parallels the events of Revenge of the Sith. And while the Ahsoka we see here lacks the unflappable optimism that made her such a fun character to begin with, mainly due to her intense experiences in the war and overall attitude towards the Jedi council, the former Jedi remains a firm believer in all things good; and continues to fight for what she believes in.

That said, the final episode, titled “Victory and Death,” remains the stronger of the four if only for that emotional ending in which the character abandons her lightsaber. If that weren’t enough, Anakin-as-Darth Vader later finds the saber in a heartbreaking final scene that adeptly sums up the prequels as well as The Clone Wars saga.