TV News

Potential Strike Already Affecting Movies and TV

Source: The Hollywood Reporter
June 13, 2008

The Hollywood Reporter has published two interesting articles about the current status of movie and TV projects being filmed and how the potential Screen Actors Guild (SAG) strike would affect the productions. SAG's deal with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP) ends on June 30th and if a new deal is not hammered out by then, SAG could move forward with the strike.

The first article on film projects, which you can read in full here, includes these notes on some of the major projects:

DreamWorks is wrapping both John Hamburg's "I Love You, Man" and Peter Jackson's "The Lovely Bones" this week, while Paramount is aiming to finish principal photography during in the next two weeks on its untitled Wayans Bros. comedy, "G.I. Joe" and Martin Scorsese's "Shutter Island," starring Leonardo DiCaprio. Warners is finishing up shooting on Steven Soderbergh's "The Informant," its Seth Rogen starrer "Observe and Report" and the action pic "Ninja Assassin." Universal is racing the clock on "Land of the Lost," starring Will Ferrell. Disney's "Race to Witch Mountain," "When in Rome" and "High School Musical 3" are on track to be finished by month's end. And Columbia/MGM's latest Bond adventure "Quantum of Silence" is set to wrap next week.

Columbia's "Angels and Demons," the follow-up to "The Da Vinci Code," already was forced to postpone production once when writer Akiva Goldsman could not turn in a script polish during the writers strike. With a release date moved from Dec. 19 to May 15, 2009, the film began shooting this month, with Tom Hanks and director Ron Howard on location in Rome. Crossing its fingers, Columbia is calculating that if a strike does force a shutdown, production can resume in time to make the spring release date.

DreamWorks/Paramount's "Transformers" sequel is before the cameras in Pennsylvania, with shooting eventually set to move to New Mexico. In the event of a strike, director Michael Bay figures he can shut down principal photography and focus on VFX and second unit work. Halcyon's "Terminator Salvation: The Future Begins," which is shooting exteriors in New Mexico now before moving to soundstages next month, is planning a similar strategy if its actors become unavailable.


Updates on other projects can be found here. Regarding the TV shows, the next article includes these bits:

On the series production side, it is ironic that "24" -- the show most impacted by the writers strike as its seventh season was scrapped by Fox -- is the best prepared to weather a SAG strike. With 12 episodes already in the can and the two-hour prequel set to wrap production by month's end, "24" is certain to air a full season.

About two dozen broadcast series -- including "Heroes," "House," "Bones," "My Name Is Earl," "ER," "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," "CSI: NY," "Criminal Minds," "Brothers & Sisters," "Chuck," "Dirty Sexy Money" and "Life" -- will have episodes in the can by July 1 as some stayed in continuous production or resumed shooting quickly because of the fallout of the writers strike. But there will be no finished product of such heavyweights as "Grey's Anatomy," "Desperate Housewives," "CSI: Miami" and "The Office," prompting speculation that networks might consider pushing the start of the 2008-09 season if there is a long SAG strike.

Cable series whose shooting schedules would be disrupted include USA's "The Starter Wife," "Monk," "Psych," "Burn Notice" and "Law & Order: CI," HBO's "Big Love," "Entourage" and "True Blood" and Showtime's "Weeds," "Brotherhood," "Dexter" and "Californication."

Late-night shows, which were hard hit by the writers strike, won't be affected much beyond talent booking, with Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" and "The Colbert Report" in best position because they rarely have actors as guests.


More on the TV shows can be read here.





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