Arthur C. Clarke Gone at Age 90

ON

Arthur C. Clarke, a visionary science fiction writer who wrote “2001: A Space Odyssey” and won worldwide acclaim with more than 100 books on space, science and the future, died Wednesday, an aide said. He was 90.

Clarke, who had battled debilitating post-polio syndrome for years, died at 1:30 a.m. in his adopted home of Sri Lanka after suffering breathing problems, aide Rohan De Silva said.

The 1968 story “2001: A Space Odyssey” – written simultaneously as a novel and screenplay with director Stanley Kubrick – was a frightening prophesy of artificial intelligence run amok.

From 1950, he began a prolific output of both fiction and non-fiction, sometimes publishing three books in a year. He published his best-selling “3001: The Final Odyssey” when he was 79.

A statement from Clarke’s office said that Clarke had recently reviewed the final manuscript of his latest novel. “The Last Theorem,” co-written with Frederik Pohl, will be published later this year, the statement said.

Some of his best-known books are “Childhood’s End,” 1953; “The City and The Stars,” 1956; “The Nine Billion Names of God,” 1967; “Rendezvous with Rama,” 1973; “Imperial Earth,” 1975; and “The Songs of Distant Earth,” 1986.

When Clarke and Kubrick got together to develop a movie about space, they used as basic ideas several of Clarke’s shorter pieces, including “The Sentinel,” written in 1948, and “Encounter in the Dawn.” As work progressed on the screenplay, Clarke also wrote a novel of the story. He followed it up with “2010,””2061,” and “3001: The Final Odyssey.”

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