Tokyo Gore Police

ON

Coming soon!

Directed by Yoshihiro Nishimura

Review:

In a future not so distant, Tokyo criminals have upped the ante by becoming genetically engineered mutants aptly called engineers. Birthed by the Keyman with a past vendetta tied to the Tokyo Police Force, they were forced to develop a Special Forces unit to combat them, engineer hunters. The finished product is the Tokyo Gore Police. An incredible treat for splatter fans the world over, there is nothing held back here. From extreme fetish bars to the ultimate case of vagina dentata and ringing in at almost 2 hours in length your brain will need a rinsing when this one is over.

Ruka played by Eihi Shiina (Takashi Miike’s Audition) as the efficient hunter who witnessed her father’s murder and mother’s suicide; directed by the special effects guru behind Machine Girl Yoshihiro Nishimura and written by Kengo Kaji (Uzumaki), TGP boasts some of the most outrageous things you have ever seen. Coupled with a Verhoeven-esque satirical style with early Cronenberg obscenity Nishimura has created something that will surely be a hit amongst genre fans.

Right from the get-go people have been making comparisons to Peter Jackson’s Dead Alive in terms of the sheer amount of bloodshed and gore but the truth is that the two are different. Dead Alive is more splatter-chunk-gore while TGP is more arterial- spray-happy. In one instance after dealing with a subway pervert Ruka uses her parasol to shield her from the literal downpour of blood. But who are we kidding; both are unapologetically violent and gory.

There is no doubt that there is a story here but that takes the side stage. With the exception of Shiina, who is fitting but rather dry, the other actors play a caricature of who they are. Cops wear bomb squad style samurai uniforms with big guns and engineers, when mortally wounded, generate impressive and powerful weapons right out of their body. Without giving too much away, there is a scene of duel wielding chainsaws that would make Dennis Hopper blush. But the best part? No awful CGI blood. There are scenes with sparsely-used CGI but the blood and mutations are all prosthetics. As the film goes on it gets more and more absurd trying to top the previous bloodbath and that is by no means a complaint.

With a psychotic charm and joyfully outlandishness Tokyo Gore Police manages to do what few films of this genre can do – make a good one. Excellently choreographed fight scenes (Versus’ Tak Sakaguchi) hilarious commercial segments like the newest Wrist Cutting blades that match your wardrobe or the virtual Wii-like remote that lets you execute criminals from your own home shows us the death-obsessed universe that Nishimura has created. Promising more gore for their next feature we can only hope that this talented team delivers once again.